newprotest.org: THE REAL DEAL

THE REAL DEAL

January 18, 2008
by: jovial_cynic

image: Obama in the 'hood (cc) - ART -

Critics have accused Obama of not being in the system long enough to be effective. I'll suggest that he hasn't been in the political machine long enough to have been corrupted by it.

Obama began by recalling a moment in Tuesday night's debate when he and his rivals were asked to name their biggest weakness. Obama answered first, saying he has a messy desk and needs help managing paperwork - something his opponents have since used to suggest he's not up to managing the country. Former North Carolina Sen. John Edwards said his biggest weakness is that he has a powerful response to seeing pain in others, and Clinton said she gets impatient to bring change to America.

"Because I'm an ordinary person, I thought that they meant, 'What's your biggest weakness?'" Obama said to laughter from a packed house at Rancho High School. "If I had gone last I would have known what the game was. And then I could have said, 'Well, ya know, I like to help old ladies across the street. Sometimes they don't want to be helped. It's terrible.'"

...

"Those kinds of tricks, that kind of approach to politics is what has to stop because what happens is then nobody believes anything," Obama said. "The voters don't believe what politicians say. They get cynical. Folks in Congress, they'll tell you they're looking out for you - they're looking out for somebody else. We have to change that politics and that's why I'm running for president."


There's a reason Obama has been called "the real deal." It'll be nice to have a person who is genuine in the White House.
np category: politics
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COMMENTS for THE REAL DEAL


The Conservative Manifesto said:
Aww, it's so cute how enamored left-of-center folks are with the ambiguous ways of Mr. Obama. Heck, even "reporters" find it hard to stay objective when talking about this guy.

Aw schucks!

January 18, 2008


jovial_cynic said:
If ambiguous means "not clearly political," I'll take it.
January 18, 2008


The Conservative Manifesto said:
Nah, I mean ambiguous as in "CHANGE!", "HOPE!", and more "CHANGE!" followed by "HOPE!"

=)

January 18, 2008


jovial_cynic said:
I'm sure you know that you can get details on Obama's position on issues on his site. "Hope" and "change" aren't ambiguous statements about his positions on issues. They're slogans.

Come on. You're in marketing, right? You know this.

January 18, 2008


wonder said:
I'm starting to think i may have mis-judged senator Obama. I didn't really like him very much, and still think some of his ideas need tweaking (i.e. i think it's really bad to penalize people for not signing up early for health care by making them pay even more)

I'm increasingly disappojnted with John Edwards (my previous favorite), he's starting to sound like a cardboard politician.

January 18, 2008


The Conservative Manifesto said:
"CHANGE!"

"HOPE!"

"CHANGE!"

=)

January 18, 2008


jovial_cynic said:
You know, reductive characterizations are just as bad as what you're describing.
January 18, 2008


The Conservative Manifesto said:
Oh come on. It's Friday. Have a little fun!

=)

January 18, 2008


The Conservative Manifesto said:
p.s. By "reductive characterizations" you're certainly not referring to labeling the Vice President of the United States of America a "monster".

Noooooo. In that case, you were simply stating a fact.

Haha.

=P

January 18, 2008


jovial_cynic said:
haha... I don't absolve myself of culpability here. :)

You're using my search feature, aren't you? Man, I figured that'd come back and bite me in butt.


January 18, 2008


wonder said:
that's the risk of posting your thoughts online, dude.

:)

January 19, 2008


Robby said:
He sounds very "real" and "down to earth" and "like every day average working and non working citizens". I am considering him?
January 19, 2008


luke said:
Doesn't lack of political experience mean that he'll lack the finess that comes with experience? Given the Middle-Easten issues we face it's hardly the time for newb errors in the white house.

That and his voting record has shown that he is the most fringe left of all the US Senate. That's hardly balanced candidate. Obama can say what he wants but I don't trust him.


January 26, 2008


jovial_cynic said:
Bush had political experience, plus his dad to watch, and his unilateral foreign policy hasn't exactly been a model platform. I'm not sure that having political experience is an end-all measure in this case.
January 27, 2008


valdez said:
Hey Josh,

As much as it pains a conservative like me to admit it, I like Obama. I don't agree with his stance on Iraq, and I'm totally opposed to any further effort to bring amnesty to illegal aliens (like an overwhelming majority of Americans). But aside from those issues, Obama has ran a clean campaign and held his own extremely well against the Clinton drama machine. I appreciate the fact that I know where he stands on the issues, whether I agree with him or not. Standing up for what you believe in, regardless of what may or may not be popular is one very important characteristic of a good leader. Hillary's stance is that she will say or do whatever she thinks it will take for her to obtain the White House. Nothing else matters to her, including her own integrity (if she still has any). I just got my ballot in the mail today to vote for the primary candidates. Being a conservative, I'm usually going for the Republican ballot. But this time, I'm going to vote for Obama for the primary. If he gets the Dem's nod (I really hope he does), I will vote for him for President. If not, I will react to my Clinton phobia and jump on the McCain band wagon with the other RINO's to try to stop her.

February 02, 2008


jovial_cynic said:
Whoa. Let it go on the record that Ed plans to vote for a democrat. :)

Seriously, though - I like Obama for the same reasons you mentioned.

February 03, 2008


jovial_cynic said:
It looks like you aren't the only conservative voting for Obama. Check this out:

www.republicansforobama.org

From the site:

Senator Obama has rejected the politics of division and the win-at-all-costs attitude that has hurt our ability to move forward as a nation. While we as Republicans will not always see eye to eye with a President Obama, we know that his politics of competency and unity will lead to a stronger America.

February 04, 2008


The Conservative Manifesto said:

Used your search box again.

=P

Wondering your thoughts on this now-a-days. As reports surface of the president threatening to withdraw support for those in his own party who dare waver in their support for his healthcare craziness... is Obama still "the real deal"?

March 16, 2010


jovial_cynic said:
TCM -

At this point, I do believe that the president has lost his way. But my "real deal" bit in this post was originally about the fact that he didn't enter the arena with a politicians mindset. And I think, to a degree, that this is still true. I think Obama's problem is he banked too much on healthcare being the legacy he leaves behind.

Obama's one-trick-pony may need to be put down and swapped out for a real workhorse.

March 16, 2010


The Conservative Manifesto said:

"Obama's one-trick-pony may need to be put down and swapped out for a real workhorse."

Well put, brother.

Although, we do disagree on whether or not President Obama was of a politician's mindset from the early stages of his two year campaign. I'm more inclined to believe he was fully schooled in the Chicago political machine -- even enough to know that he had to convince the body public that we wasn't.

But perhaps that's just me being a... well... cynic.

;-)

March 16, 2010


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