newprotest.org: a healthy criticism of everything

1972 40' TOLLYCRAFT TRI-CABIN

September 23, 2017
by: jovial_cynic
The next adventure looks like it's going to take place on this 1972 40' Tollycraft...



We picked up this boat, and instead of jumping right in headfirst like we did on the 1959 Matthews, we had this boat hauled out and surveyed, bottom-painted, and made certain that we liked the layout. We wanted to make sure that we got a boat that we could keep and be happy cruising and sleeping on.

comments [0]

np category: boating
tags:

1959 42' MATTHEWS STOCK CRUISER

September 23, 2017
by: jovial_cynic
This weekend, my wife and I had the most amazing adventure. Technically, it started two weeks ago,when we made the incredibly crazy decision to buy a boat. And not just any boat. A 1959 42-foot wood trawler. For just $4,900.

You know what they say about buying a boat, right? The less the purchase price, the more the overall cost of the boat. I felt like challenging the odds. I decided to buy the boat based on the seller's word that the two diesel engines ran just fine, and that it wasn't actively leaking, and that the boat had been to Alaska and back. I bought it before even getting fresh batteries in the boat to start it... because, hey - $4,900 boat!



After spending a day with my family cleaning the previous owner's decades-worth of accumulation, paying a diesel mechanic to give the engines a quick view, and spending some money to replace a raw-water pump, we were in luck: the engines were in great shape. They fired right up, and were easy to control. After spending some time draining the bilge (the existing bilge pumps were toast, we hooked up a household sump pump to address any water intrusion), we decided to brave the trip from Bremerton to Olympia. At an average of 6 knots, this was going to be a long trip.



And... we made it! 8.5 hours this Saturday, we pulled the boat out of the previous owner's boathouse, took it to the nearby fueling station, and then ventured out into Puget Sound. We had to learn a few things along the way - like how to make sure the engines were synced up properly (the stock tachometers weren't hooked up), how to feather the transmissions to get the boat to turn on a dime, making parking much easier, and how to fight the wind and current near the Tacoma Narrows Bridges.





Along the way, we saw 14 harbor seals and a manta ray playing on the surface. We also got to see Seattle and Mt. Rainier from the water in a way we'd never seen before. We got to go *under* the Narrows Bridges! And we took turns piloting the vessel. In all, this was one of the most romantic weekend we've ever had.







And we also both decided that, after this grand adventure on this old wood boat, we are definitely boat people. Big boat people. But... not necessarily this boat. Old wood boats need a lot of maintenance, and this one is no exception. It also doesn't have the layout that's conducive to family life. We do have 3 kids, after all, and having an open "family room" style layout is important to us. So we listed the boat for sale for about the same price I paid (plus the cost of the new batteries I put in) as soon as we landed in Olympia, and have already taken a deposit. I'm a little sad to see it go, but I'm glad we got to learn quite a bit about boating in a fun, high-stakes kind of way.



This concludes the adventure on this particular boat. But it is just the beginning of the boating adventures that the Culley family will enjoy. Thanks for reading!



comments [0]

np category: boating
tags:

SCA WARRIOR

June 08, 2017
by: jovial_cynic


This was a request for a knight. Or rather, somebody dressed up for an SCA boffing match.

comments [0]

np category: welding
tags:

WONDERWOMAN

June 07, 2017
by: jovial_cynic


With the release of the new Wonder Woman movie, I figured this would be an appropriate figurine to make.

comments [0]

np category: welding
tags:

ARBOR

June 05, 2017
by: jovial_cynic
Last week, a buddy of mine asked me if I could throw together an arbor by the weekend, in time for a video shoot for Penny Palabras. Having never made one before, I told him I could absolutely get it done.



It turns out that garden arbors aren't terribly complicated. It's just the lattice that makes it seem difficult, but you can get a 2'x8' sheet of cedar lattice for about $13 at Home Depot. Cut it to length and sandwich it between a few 2x4 studs and you're good to go.



Most of the cutting was done with the miter saw and the circular saw. However, I didn't have an easy way to cut out the spots where the 2x6 horizontal pieces would go, so I did it the old fashioned way: hammer and chisel. It turned out much easier than I thought it would, and the pieces went in quite flush.



Here's a close-up shot where the 2x4s and the 2x6s come together. Without much work, it already looks pretty amazing.



To create an extra dimension to the wood, I used a router bit that I picked up for a couple of bucks at a garage sale. It's nothing fancy, but it adds quite a bit to the wood.



This is before adding a cedar-colored oil coat to the arbor. It's pretty slick how quickly this thing went up.



And here is the finished product, with cedar-colored oil, and a few extra slats on top. I sent it off to the location where it'll be used in the videos.


comments [0]

np category: DIY
tags:

DUST ROOM

April 24, 2017
by: jovial_cynic
I've got a small shop at my new place in Washington. Small-ish, anyway. It's big enough for one car, a metalworking space, and a woodworking space. I've been working with wood a lot more lately, including my CNC machine, and I'm constantly trying to keep up with the sawdust and wood particles in the air. It's a mess, really. My poor Datsun 510 is constantly covered in sawdust!

I've decided to partition off a section of my shop for the woodwork by installing walls. Originally, I was going to fully frame out the walls, but my genius wife suggested doing something less permanent.



This is where the CNC machine lives. It's in the back corner of the shop to try to keep the dust it makes as far away from everything as possible. But a small shop can't avoid getting dust all over it unless you wall things off.



In addition to walling off the woodworking area, I thought that having an air filtration system installed would be a very good idea. There's no sense in drowning in sawdust. I've seen many DIY filtration designs, but I figured I'd do it the way a house fan is done: fan on one side of the area with filtered openings on the other side.



After tracing out the fan housing and building a box for support, I installed the fan on the far corner of the enclosure.



Here's another shot of it.





I used some thick clear plastic over some 2x2" studs. Because these walls aren't going to hold anything other than the plastic, I didn't need to bother with proper 2x4" studs or leave 16" (or is it 24"?) spaces between the studs. These 2x2"s are 36" apart and will do serve just fine.



Here's the installation of the filter. Pretty straight forward, but I may end up installing a second one above it. The fan is pretty powerful, and I'm concerned that there's not enough opportunity for the air to escape the room.



And here's the result. The woodworking room is fully sectioned off in the shop with all the wood tools inside. I have a few spots to seal up so the air only escapes through the filter, but I think this should work!

comments [0]

np category: DIY
tags:

PASSOVER AND EASTER

April 13, 2017
by: jovial_cynic


There's often an association between traditional celebrations of Easter and pagan traditions centered around fertility, spring-time, etc. Easter bunnies, eggs - none of it is biblical, but it has become a tradition that Christians participate in.

An often missed association is between Easter and the Jewish Passover celebration. It is the remembrance of the time God struck down the Egyptians who enslaved Israel with ten plagues, the 10th being the death of the firstborn in the land by way of the Destroying Angel. The only way for anyone in Egypt to be saved was to take a young unblemished lamb into the home, kill it to be eaten, but first taking a hyssop branch dipped in the lamb's blood and marking the side and top door posts of the home with that blood. By seeing the blood covering the door posts, the Destroying Angel would *pass over* the house and not enter it, sparing those inside from destruction.

Jesus' death on the cross served as an extension of that story: as the unblemished Lamb of God, his blood was shed to cover our door posts, so that when God's Destroying Angel is sent to destroy wickedness in the world, he will *pass over* those who are covered.

The celebration of Easter, for Christians, is about recognizing that the Lamb was the son of God, voluntarily laying down his life for us. And while this story could remain somber as we reflect on a senseless death, the celebration of Easter is the story of resurrection - the Lamb is raised from the dead, and encourages us to know that the work of salvation is final. We are redeemed. We are saved by the blood of the lamb.

And for that, we Praise God.

comments [0]

np category: theology
tags:
[archives]